Bridestones, North Yorkshire UK


• 4-star hikes
• 1 to 10 mile options
• Medium difficulty | Gain 250 to 1,750 feet
• North York Moors, UK | North Yorkshire
. a person with a backpack trekking towards a distinctive rock formation with a broad base that tapers to a top capped by an overhanging darker layer of rock. The surrounding landscape is verdant, featuring grass, shrubs, and trees under a cloudy sky. The rock’s unique shape and the natural setting suggest geological interest Expand Map

RED 4★ The Bridestones
1.4 mi loop, medium, gain 250 ft (75 m)
AllTrails · GPX File · Directions
PURPLE 4★ The Bridestones & Valley Loop
1.9 mi loop, medium, gain 360 ft (110 m)
AllTrails · GPX File · Directions
green icon 4★ Blakey Topping & Bridestones
9.8 mi loop, medium, gain 1,750 ft (530 m)
AllTrails · GPX File · Directions

Known by the ancient Norse as edge-stones, these geologic remnants of 150 million year old sedimentary rock stand proud above the North York Moors landscape. Wind-worn and rounded by the elements they make a worthy destination for a hike, or as part of a longer stroll around the valley's ridgeline and down into the grassy, wildflower-strewn meadow below.

These short trails are accessible from a parking lot in Dalby Forest. A fee is payable to visit the forest, but this allows you to park in any area and includes several picnic locations and additionally restroom facilities. We visited the site by way of a longer ten mile hike that we describe at the end of this article.

a person with a backpack trekking towards a distinctive rock formation with a broad base that tapers to a top capped by an overhanging darker layer of rock. The surrounding landscape is verdant, featuring grass, shrubs, and trees under a cloudy sky. The rock’s unique shape and the natural setting suggest geological interest
The most precarious of the Bridestone rock formations.

4★ The Bridestones: The easiest way to reach the Bridestones is on a single-track woodland trail a short distance from the parking area. Short but steep, however. Those averse to inclines will prefer to take a clockwise route, but this still requires a brief uphill slog. A well-built cobbled footpath leads you past parade of Bridestones which you'll want to investigate from all angles, and are free to climb should you wish. Perhaps you can identify which stones are named Indian's Head, the Villain, the Cheeseblock? After the last of them, you'll reach a viewpoint where you'll want to decide between turning around or continuing on the longer loop trail.

4★ The Bridestones & Valley Loop: Bridestones can be found on both sides of the valley. Though the best are to be found on the valley's east ridge, the rest are also worth a visit, especially when combined with a return trek among woodland and through grassy meadow within earshot of the nearby stream.

4★ Blakey Topping & Bridestones: We visited the Bridestones by connecting to a loop trail of Blakey Topping, which we've reviewed separately and linked at the bottom of this article. Though we recommend both of these as great short hikes, stringing them together added substantial additional mileage that didn't involve much in the way of extra features. We've linked the route here in case you wish to follow it, but we've excluded it from the above embedded Google Map. This longer hike can be started at the Saltergate trailhead and parking area which is also served by the Coastliner 840 double-decker public bus. Known as Britain's most scenic bus route, it serves Leeds, York, Pickering and Whitby among other destinations.

a verdant landscape with rolling hills covered in dense greenery and two distinct rock formations atop the hills. The partly cloudy sky suggests a pleasant day.
Looking across from the far side of the valley to the Bridestones.

a tranquil scene in a lush forest. A narrow dirt path, well-trodden and inviting, leads the viewer’s eye towards a small wooden bridge that crosses a narrow stream. The bridge, simple yet sturdy, blends seamlessly into the surroundings, suggesting a harmony between human-made structures and nature. The forest itself is a vibrant display of various shades of green, with dense vegetation covering the ground and trees towering above, their leaves forming a canopy that filters the sunlight. Ferns and other underbrush add texture to the scene, creating a sense of depth and richness.
The Valley Loop includes grassy meadowland and a stream crossing.

A serene forest scene with an individual walking on a narrow dirt path, surrounded by a variety of trees and underbrush, including ferns.
Walking to the bridestones includes a short inclined woodland trail.

Tangents:
• Official: National Trust · Dalby Forest
• Facebook Group: Comment on this article
• Public Maps at AllTrails: Bridestones · Blakey & Bridestones

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